EMI's 'I Don't Wana Go'; an intertwining of multiple genres & the potential future

EMI's 'I Don't Wana Go'; an intertwining of multiple genres & the potential future


Washington’s EMI releases a cold “R&B/Soul” record via Soundcloud with ‘I Don’t Wana Go’. It is felt that this track is a combination of multiple genres, thus the sound is intriguing. Could this be the next reigning genre of popular culture.

Personally, this is the first record I’ve heard from EMI, though I am lucky it was this, as it is a big, appealing and dynamic introduction. Produced by Searcy & Londn Blue, the instrumental is smooth, slow and mature. The use of large reverb and atmospheric textures create this record into a full production and form a stunning contrast to EMI’s sweet voice.

The Seattle-based singer also crafts her hand at songwriting, and by the sounds of this record, she most definitely holds a talent. As she takes us through her stories using a dynamic vocal range, attractive melodies, and intriguing effects. We hear the struggles her current situation, though grateful of the fact that she creates music and holds this lifestyle. Yet, almost stubborn at the fact that she needs to persist as the threat of failure trails closely behind at all times. This is very real and very honest content from the young singer, and something that definitely doesn’t apply just to her. The music business is ruthless and fast-paced. A failure could mean the different between a steady career and having to find another route. Thus, that pressure for artists must be intense and foreboding.

Notable within this sound are elements from rap and pop music. The percussion is heavily influence by the younger brother of hip hop, plus we can hear Travis Scott-esque sounds in some melodies and effects. Whilst EMI’s smooth tones, lush voice and content are reminiscent of pop and R&B. EMI states on her Soundcloud that this genre is R&B/soul, yet really is sounds like a combination of all 4 mentioned above. Using one genre is too vague these days - Neyo was R&B, and Otis Redding was soul, but does this record sit in the same category? Granted music and genres evolve, and this is what has happened here. This track from EMI is phenomenal and personally, it’s unjustified to subject it to one single genre. What can be heard is an intertwining of multiple genres, and a darker, more mature tone placed upon pop music. This merge of genres helps old ones stay relevant and popular, but also grows the new - pop with EDM; R&B with rap; country with rap; pop with rap; R&B with UK Drill, UK rap with Afrobeats, etc. Are these all placed under old genres? Or should we create new names?
Whatever is technically at the top, eventually the tides will turn and there will be other at the top of the genre ladder. Could this be it?


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